Should Government Watch the Terrorists — or Americans Reaching for a Snack?

By Amy Payne

Justin Sullivan/Getty Images

With recent news of various government agencies wanting to monitor our nation’s newsrooms and our children’s eating habits, and with a $17 trillion debt that continues to rise, perhaps it is time to paraphrase President John F. Kennedy:

Ask not what government can do for us, but what we can do for ourselves.

Whether it’s a new law making McDonald’s tell us how many calories are in a Big Mac or the Federal Communications Commission demanding broadcasters keep TV commercials from being too loud, one wonders if we need a government agency to tuck us in at night and read us a bedtime story.

Is there anything, ANYTHING, according to the Left that government shouldn’t be monitoring, regulating, overseeing, approving, or funding?

From Common Core—mandating what our children are taught, how they are taught it, and how we know if they learned it—to what size soft drink, what kind of light bulb, or what kind of health care plan you as an adult can buy…Where does it stop?

The debate over marketing of sugary snacks in schools is small ball. It’s not the point. Of course we want kids to be healthy. But don’t we want the government monitoring terrorists instead of our school cafeterias?

Let’s talk about what the government can stop doing. A good place to start is the things we can actually do ourselves—for example, monitoring what our kids eat and using our remote controls to turn down the commercials on our TVs.

As consumers and taxpayers, it’s fair to ask whether these government mandates are needed—and whether they work.

Take the light bulb issue. This was part of an energy bill passed by Congress and signed into law by President George W. Bush in 2007 to attempt to phase out ordinary incandescent bulbs and …read more

Source: Should Government Watch the Terrorists — or Americans Reaching for a Snack?

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